Reading Through the Bible, August 3. Isaiah 24-26

    Follow the design of this book:

    Chapter 13 began a long section detailing judgment against the nations of the earth, culminating in judgment on God’s own people in chapter 22.  The section ends with a judgment against all the nations of the earth in chapter 24 and a hymn of praise in chapters 25-26.

    The question for us now is: does chapter 24 refer to the end of the world?

    It could. 

    It may, however, simply be a summary statement of the sovereignty of God over all nations.

    In chapter 27, Isaiah is going to begin pronouncing judgment on God’s people once again, and end it with a chapter of judgment against the nations of the world in chapter 34 and a hymn of praise in chapter 35.

    Two sections: chapters 13-26 and chapters 27-35.  Different words, but the same message – repeated for emphasis.  God is in control, and he wants people to pay attention to His will.

    As I write these words in mid-July, the governor of Missouri has called for a day of prayer in behalf of his tornado ravaged State.  Three months earlier, the governor of Texas called for a day of prayer because of the great drought facing his State.  I don’t object to this, but I find it interesting in light of Isaiah.  Our republic chafes at the notion of being submissive to God.  Our politicians are quick to point out that their religious convictions do not inform nor dictate their policies.  But with their backs to the wall, they have the audacity to beseech God’s blessings. We want Him when we need Him, and when we don’t, we ignore Him.

    We cannot have it both ways.  Isaiah makes it plain: God is in control.  All who choose to ignore that fact travel a sure path to failure, heartache, and pain — Christian and non-Christian alike.