Tuesday, January 8. Job 14 – 16

In the ancient world, people believed that a murdered person’s blood cried out for justice until the blood was covered up. They also believed that the spirit of the deceased would not find rest until the corpse was buried. So, in chapter sixteen, as Job believes his days will soon come to an end, he begs for swift justice.

But who will bring it?

Certainly not his friends. They have been most callous in the condemnation of Job. Without evidence they pronounce him guilty of spiritual debauchery.

So who will argue Job’s case?

Surprisingly, Job believes, God will.

After all the bad things Job has said and believes about God’s injustice toward him, Job believes that God knows better than He has treated his servant, and that God must, because He is just, not only defend Job’s innocence, but proclaim it.

Job’s is an uncommon faith. But to lean relentlessly on the God you believe has attacked you, because you know there must have been a mistake, and you equally know this God will make it right, is not only uncommon, but exemplary. It is faith of the highest order.