Monday, July 29. 2 Kings 23, Daniel 1 – 2

Chapter two of Daniel contains a Joseph story of sorts. The similarity is on purpose. Note that Daniel personally asks the king for time that he might interpret the dream for him. But when Daniel goes to the king, he is “introduced” by Arioch who claims to have “found” among the exiles of Judah a man who can interpret the dream. The author of Daniel wants the reader to make the connection with Joseph, who was “introduced” to Pharaoh and someone who can interpret dreams.

But chapter two also serves to emphasize the sovereignty of God.

The astrologers protest that “there is not a man on earth who can do what the king asks.” No one can reveal the king’s dream except the gods – who do not live among men. Daniel affirms the conclusion of the astrologers: “no [one] can explain to the king the mystery” of his dream. But there is a God in heaven who can. This God has given the kingship to Nebuchadnezzar, but only temporarily. All kingdoms are temporary until this particular God sets up a kingdom that can never be destroyed. Nebuchadnezzar proclaims Daniel’s God the God of gods and Lord of kings.

In piggybacking on the story of Joseph, Daniel is connected to deliverance – at least the promise of it. This chapter sets the stage for a discussion of what is to come before God sets up his permanent kingdom.