Tuesday, September 17. 2 Chronicles 12 – 14

Asa, great-grandson of Solomon, ruled Judah for forty one years. His grand-father, Rehoboam, had abandoned the Lord and led in the worship of idols. Asa’s father, Abijah, had done nothing to stop that apostasy, though he had exhibited uncommon trust in God, enabling him to totally defeat the Northern Kingdom in battle. Because of his trust in God, the Lord gave him victory despite the fact that he was surrounded by an army twice the size of his own.

Asa, however, acted positively to contain and eliminate idolatry in Judah and he exhibited the faith of his father when it came to battle. God gave Asa a similar victory.

Asa’s later life would not be so faithful. Even though he would go so far as to punish his own mother because of her idolatry, Asa in his later years will trust more in himself and less in God. In time of political crisis, he will seek rescue by making an alliance with a pagan king, paying for protection with gold from the Lord’s temple. He will go through personal crisis, but will not turn to God for help.

It’s a fact: often those most devoted to orthodoxy trust the Lord the least. There’s nothing wrong with orthodoxy – adhering to the rules. But nothing will replace a whole-hearted trust in God. This is what He wants most of all.

Reading Through the Bible, Wednesday, April 27. 2 Chronicles 14-16

Asa, great-grandson of Solomon, ruled Judah for forty one years.  His grand-father, Rehoboam, had abandoned the Lord and led in the worship of idols.  Asa’s father, Abijah, had done nothing to stop that apostasy, though he had exhibited uncommon trust in God, enabling him to totally defeat the Northern Kingdom in battle.  Because of his trust in God, the Lord gave him victory despite the fact that he was surrounded by an army twice the size of his own.

Asa, however, acted positively to contain and eliminate idolatry in Judah and he exhibited the faith of his father when it came to battle.  God gave Asa a similar victory.

Asa’s later life would not be so faithful.  Even though he would go so far as to punish his own mother because of her idolatry, Asa in his later years will trust more in himself and less in God.  In time of political crisis, he will seek rescue by making an alliance with a pagan king, paying for protection with gold from the Lord’s temple.  He will go through personal crisis, but will not turn to God for help.

It’s a fact: often those most devoted to orthodoxy trust the Lord the least.  There’s nothing wrong with orthodoxy – adhering to the rules.  But nothing will replace a whole-hearted trust in God.  This is what He wants most of all.