Saturday, April 14. Psalms 7 – 10

The writer of these psalms has lots of enemies.  Reference to them occurs 93 times throughout the book.

Sometimes they are enemies who aim to do him harm.

At other times, they are simply the wicked, those who live without regard for the will of God, who by their inattentiveness must presume God does not know what they are up to – otherwise He would do something.

And it’s that “doing something” that often bothers the Psalmist.  Why doesn’t God take action?  Why does he allow these people to treat Him with such discourtesy?  Just as important, why does He allow them to treat others so cruelly?  At times, as in Psalm 10, the writer seems terribly frustrated at God.

And yet, even in times when it seems God is either blind or impotent, the Psalmist knows he has no recourse for justice but to the Lord, and so he continues to lift up his prayers to Him.

As is the Psalmist.  Christians should be interested in justice, in the plight of the underdog.  But must also keep in mind that full and complete justice rests with God.  We will never have it on the earth until God finally steps in to bring it.  The writer of this Psalm is anxious enough for God to do it, and confident enough that He can and will, that he makes it the entire focus of this prayer.

At times, our prayers need to be just as anxious, confident and focused for exactly the same thing.