Tuesday, June 3. Psalms 28 – 30

When he lost the bid for the governorship of California, Richard Nixon held a press conference in which he said: “As I leave you I want you to know…. just think how much you’re going to be missing. You don’t have Nixon to kick around any more, because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.”

I think about those bitter words whenever I read Psalm 30. Or Psalm 6.

In both psalms, the writer has found himself in dire straits. Rescue has seemed unlikely. Prayers have been offered, but not answered. And in desperation, the writer, hurt that God has not responded in a timely manner, says, in effect: “Who’s going to praise you when I’m gone?”

It won’t be the last time we read such bitterness, but at least, in both cases, the writer found that in time, God did respond and provide deliverance.

One way or another He always does. “Weeping may remain for a night, but rejoicing comes in the morning.”

He just doesn’t guarantee which morning.

Saturday, April 21. Psalms 30 – 33

When he lost the bid for the governorship of California, Richard Nixon held a press conference in which he said: “As I leave you I want you to know…. just think how much you’re going to be missing. You don’t have Nixon to kick around any more, because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.”

I think about those bitter words whenever I read Psalm 30.  Or Psalm 6.

In both psalms, the writer has found himself in dire straits.  Rescue has seemed unlikely.  Prayers have been offered, but not answered.  And in desperation, the writer, hurt that God has not responded in a timely manner, says, in effect: “Who’s going to praise you when I’m gone?”

It won’t be the last time we read such bitterness, but at least, in both cases, the writer found that in time, God did respond and provide deliverance.

One way or another He always does.  “Weeping may remain for a night, but rejoicing comes in the morning.”

He just doesn’t guarantee which morning.