Friday, April 11. 2 Kings 17 – 19

Of all the kings of Judah in the divided kingdom period, not one comes close to Hezekiah in faithfulness to the Lord. Many have walked in the footsteps of David. Many have done “what was right in the eyes of the Lord.” But until Hezekiah, no one has destroyed the “High Places.” The High Places were sacred spots to the Canaanites where worship and sacrifice was offered to the Lord. God had forbidden their use and commanded their destruction. His people didn’t listen.

Wonder why?

It may have been that they hesitated to offend the Canaanites whose land they had occupied. More likely, however, the High Places simply offered convenient places of worship, helping to avoid the time-consuming trips to Jerusalem where God had “caused his name to dwell.”

The world will not understand why we live and worship the way we do unless they come to know the Lord. And they will not come to know Him as he really is, if we adopt a service to him that is more convenient to us and less obedient to Him.

Hezekiah offers us an example of a life so often lived by Christians. He was obedient to God, but he had little faith. His life was full of fear in days of trial, and he often forgot the God who blessed him when things were good. Obedient? Yes. A man of faith? Not so much. God wants both.

Reading Through the Bible, Tuesday, April 12. 2 Kings 19-21

Of all the kings of Judah in the divided kingdom period, not one comes close to Hezekiah in faithfulness to the Lord.  Many have walked in the footsteps of David.  Many have done “what was right in the eyes of the Lord.”  But until Hezekiah, no one has destroyed the “High Places.”  The High Places were sacred spots to the Canaanites where worship and sacrifice were offered to the Lord.  God had forbidden their use and commanded their destruction.  His people didn’t listen.

Wonder why?

It may have been that they hesitated to offend the Canaanites whose land they had occupied.  More likely, however, the High Places simply offered more convenient places of worship, helping to avoid the time-consuming trips to Jerusalem where God had “caused his name to dwell.”

The world will not understand why we live and worship the way we do unless they come to know the Lord.  And they will not come to know Him as he really is, if we adopt a service to him that is more convenient to us and less obedient to Him.

Hezekiah offers us an example of a life so often lived by Christians.  He was obedient to God, but he had little faith.  His life was full of fear in days of trial, and he often forgot the God who blessed him when things were good.  Obedient?  Yes.  A man of faith?  Not so much.  God wants both.