Saturday, April 19. 1 Chronicles 18 – 21

There’s something missing from this section, do you remember what it is?

David’s sin with Bathsheba.

You should not think that the Chronicler is white-washing David’s image. As has been evident from chapter ten forward, the Chronicler expects that his readers will be familiar with the David story in Samuel. He even gives us reminders of it with the phrases “when all the kings go off to war” and “but David remained in Jerusalem.”

So why doesn’t he tell it?

David is not a perfect man. The Chronicler knows that. But there are traits David has that endear him to God. He longs for a relationship with God. He knows sin destroys that relationship and when he sins, he admits it and repents. He doesn’t always know the way of the Lord, but he wants to know it, seeks it, and when he misjudges it, makes correction quickly. Sin, in an of itself, does not destroy a leader’s ability to lead, nor absolve him of the responsibility. Sin can be dealt with and forgiven and we can continue to find ourselves blessed of God. Though the story of Bathsheba is not present in this chapter, the reader knows it, knows of David’s penitence, and sees that God continues to bless the king in a royal way.

As the royal house of God, the Lord will do the same for us when we respond to Him as David did.

Reading Through the Bible. April 20. 1 Chronicles 20-22

There’s something missing from this section, do you remember what it is?

David’s sin with Bathsheba.

You should not think that the Chronicler is white-washing David’s image.  As has been evident from chapter ten forward, the Chronicler expects that his readers will be familiar with the David story in Samuel.  He even gives us reminders of it with the phrases “when all the kings go off to war” and “but David remained in Jerusalem.”

So why doesn’t he tell it?

David is not a perfect man.  The Chronicler knows that.  But there are traits David has that endear him to God.  He longs for a relationship with God.  He knows sin destroys that relationship and when he sins, he admits it and repents.  He doesn’t always know the way of the Lord, but he wants to know it, seeks it, and when he misjudges it, makes correction quickly.  Sin, in an of itself, does not destroy a leader’s ability to lead, nor absolve him of the responsibility.  Sin can be dealt with and forgiven and we can continue to find ourselves blessed of God.  Though the story of Bathsheba is not present in this chapter, the reader knows it, knows of David’s penitence, and sees that God continues to bless the king in a royal way.

As the royal house of God, the Lord will do the same for us when we respond to Him as David did.