Friday, June 27. Psalms 106 – 108

The final eight verses of Psalms 108 and 60 are the same. They differ only in the beginning and in their titles (no historical information is offered for Psalm 108). The first five verses of Psalm 108 are the same as the last five verses of Psalm 57. This shows us some of the eclectic nature of the Psalms. Some are composed as unique pieces. Others are cobbled together from other Psalms, perhaps for different occasions.

So what, then, would be the occasion for this psalm?

The writer is aware of the love of God for His people. He is likewise aware of the promises of God to His people. And yet, once again, the writer feels abandoned by God.

Perhaps, however, the abandonment is not quite as severe as in Psalm 60, for here, the writer begins with worship and praises the faithfulness of God.

What a tremendous example of faith!

For all the writer’s suffering, he begins not in criticism nor in appeal, but in worship, the place where we are reminded, and remind one another, of God’s enduring commitment to His people. A delivering relationship with God does not begin “when you’re down and troubled and you need a helping hand.” If you don’t have it before then, it’s not likely to be there. It begins instead in the assembly of the redeemed, the household of God, gathered for worship. Those who commit themselves regularly to this worship will find themselves able to confidently call on the Lord with the greatest expectation of salvation when all about them is but chaos and defeat and the result will be a message even the nations will want to hear.