Tuesday, July 15. Proverbs 16 – 18

In a book devoted to wisdom, you would expect a lot of references to “the Lord,” for after all, the “fear of the Lord” is the beginning of wisdom. And we do find a lot of references. In fact, some ninety references throughout the book. Interestingly, though the book of Proverbs was written without our chapter divisions, the heaviest concentration of references to “the Lord” are in chapters 3, 15 and 16.

Four points stand out to me in the references and form an outline useful is seeing the far-reaching sovereignty of God expressed in the Proverbs.

First, the Lord is omni-present: His eyes are everywhere keeping watch on all mankind (15:3). Nothing is hidden from him, not even the intents and motives of your heart (15:11; 16:2).

Second, God has standards – moral absolutes if you will. Honest scales and balances are from the Lord (16:11) and those who treat these absolutes with disrespect or impunity find themselves separated from Him – even despised by Him – (15:8,9, 29) and punished by Him (15:25).

Third, the Lord is in control. Of everything (16:4). Think your own thoughts, but no matter what you think, God can control what comes out of your mouth (16:1). Make your plans, but God will adjust them as He pleases according to His will (16:9, 33). God can even make a man’s enemies be at peace with him, if that man’s ways are pleasing to God (16:7). Nothing is beyond His ability or control.

Fourth, it is, therefore, important to consider the Lord in all that we do, seeking His will and approval in all things and making sure He is foremost in our hearts and minds. Prosperity and blessing are dependent on it (16:20). “Better,” the wise man says, to have a “little” and respect the Lord, than a lot and face His opposition (15:16).

Monday, June 4. Proverbs 15-17

    In a book devoted to wisdom, you would expect a lot of references to “the Lord,” for after all, the “fear of the Lord” is the beginning of wisdom.  And we do find a lot of references.  In fact, some ninety references throughout the book.  Interestingly, though the book of Proverbs was written without our chapter divisions, the heaviest concentration of references to “the Lord” are in chapters 3, 15 and 16.

    Four points stand out to me in the references and form an outline useful is seeing the far-reaching sovereignty of God expressed in the Proverbs.

    First, the Lord is omni-present: His eyes are everywhere keeping watch on all mankind (15:3).  Nothing is hidden from him, not even the intents and motives of your heart (15:11; 16:2).

    Second, God has standards – moral absolutes if you will.  Honest scales and balances are from the Lord (16:11) and those who treat these absolutes with disrespect or impunity find themselves separated from Him – even despised by Him – (15:8,9, 29) and punished by Him (15:25).

    Third, the Lord is in control.  Of everything (16:4).  Think your own thoughts, but no matter what you think, God can control what comes out of your mouth (16:1).  Make your plans, but God will adjust them as He pleases according to His will (16:9, 33).  God can even make a man’s enemies be at peace with him, if that man’s ways are pleasing to God (16:7).  Nothing is beyond His ability or control.

    Fourth, it is, therefore, important to consider the Lord in all that we do, seeking His will and approval in all things and making sure He is foremost in our hearts and minds.  Prosperity and blessing are dependent on it (16:20).  “Better,” the wise man says, to have a “little” and respect the Lord, than a lot and face His opposition (15:16).