Friday, July 4. Psalms 129 – 131

The writer of Psalm 130 finds himself in dire straits, but the cause is specifically his sin. The writer does not blame God for sending this misfortune. He counts that the misfortune is simply the result of his own sin. That’s the way with sin sometimes. Sensitive people will recognize that their lot might simply be a consequence of behavior – not a particular divine visitation of punishment.

He’s not alone. A lot of God’s people are suffering in the Psalm – and for the same reason.

But there is reason to hope, because the very nature of God is that He is forgiving and His love is unfailing.

But you will notice there is no resolution to this prayer. Joy is anticipated, but it has not come.

Perhaps the writer wants you to see His great faith in God.

Or, perhaps, the writer wants you to consider something else. Perhaps the author is describing the cries of the unrepentant. After all, he doesn’t actually confess his sin. He doesn’t specifically ask for forgiveness – though he expects it. And since the resolution does not appear, perhaps the writer is presenting a lesson: It’s all well and good to acknowledge the forgiving nature of God, and believe He will be merciful, but such a hope is empty when expressed by unrepentant people.