Reading Through the Bible, Saturday, June 4. Psalms 27-30

    “God never closes one door but what he opens another.”

    Or so we’re told.

    Often, however, the hallway between the two is long, dark and foreboding.

    Fully one third of the Psalms mention “enemies” of the psalmist, and Psalm 27 is one of those.  The situation is only briefly mentioned.  The writer finds himself in a tough spot because he’s been falsely accused.  From the prayer itself, it’s obvious that the accusation is a serious matter.  Resolution can go either way, and the writer takes his predicament to God.

    God is his light, his rescue, and his protection.  We take light for granted.  Flip a switch, and you’re good to go.  Power out?  Use a flashlight.  No flashlight?  Turn on your cell phone.  But to ancient people, light was always a fading commodity and absolute darkness filled half a day.  It’s why God is described as “light.”  He’s the path forward.

    The psalmist does not believe God will empower him to overcome his accusers.  The situation is beyond that kind of help.  What he needs, and believes God will provide, is personal intervention.  He expects rescue in the here and now, the “land of the living.”

    The psalm ends without resolution.  We don’t know the end of the story.  Neither did David.  But whatever the end, he placed his hope in God, and provides a prayer for all those who travel a dark hallway in life.