Reading Through the Bible, Sunday, November 27. 2 Corinthians 6 – 9.

    2 Corinthians 6:14 – 18 is often applied by Christian interpreters to marriage: Christians should not marry non-Christians.  But before you accept that view, there are some things to consider:

    First, Paul is adamant about whatever he means by being “yoked together” with unbelievers.  He says “don’t do it,” and if you have done it, separate!

    Second, the Corinthian church did have members who were married to non-Christians.  And yet, when Paul specifically addresses these religiously mixed marriages, he specifically forbids a Christian to divorce the non-Christian spouse (1 Corinthians 7:12-13).

    So what are we to make of this?

    We should make of it that Paul is not specifically addressing the business of marriage in 2 Corinthians 6.  Rather, he has in mind general relationships (business, social) that might cause a Christian to compromise faith because of the relationship.

    But isn’t this precisely what marriage with non-Christians does?

    Yes, but my point is that Paul does not specifically have this relationship in mind.  Perhaps the best thing we can get from this relative to marriage is that the spiritual dimension ought to be considered when looking for a life-partner.  To leave out how such a relationship might affect your life with God – not even give it a moment’s notice – is unspiritual and short-sighted.

    On the other hand, there are plenty of other relationships in life with the pagan world that challenge our spirituality.  Consider our occupation, perhaps the second greatest challenge to spirituality.  Few people, when considering a job, will ask how this might affect their walk with the Lord – and that ought to be the first question we ask — even before we ask how it will affect our family.