Saturday, September 6. Ezekiel 14 – 17

Some of the basest language in the Bible is found in Ezekiel 16. The harshness of it, and the depraved image of God’s people it presents, shows the utter disgust God has for His people in Jerusalem.

But remember, the text isn’t written for Jerusalem. It is written for the exiles in Babylon who are looking to Jerusalem for deliverance. Imagine being a political prisoner, kidnapped and held captive in a foreign land by a government hostile to your own. You really expect your countrymen to come to your aid. You pray to God to send them: marines led by a team of Seals.

But God’s reply only denigrates your country. This is what you find in Ezekiel 16.

The rampant depravity described is actually a spiritual malady. Today, we call it religious syncretism, the folding of religions together so that the result has commonalities with them all, but is faithful to none.

Such syncretism leads invariably to pride and self-centeredness, an attitude that chases pleasure and luxury and cares nothing for the unfortunate. No matter how you feel about the harshness of this chapter, it vividly portrays how God feels about those who live such lives.